Baghali Polo | Persian Rice with Dill and Broad Beans | igotitfrommymaman.com
Persian Classics,  Persian Rice,  Vegetarian

Baghali Polo – Dill Rice with Broad Beans

Baghali Polo is a popular Persian rice dish with dill and broad beans. It is usually served with Mahiche, tender slow cooked lamb shanks.

Like every Persian rice dish there are two options of preparing it: Aabkesh or Kateh style.

Aabkesh is the method of pre-cooking the rice, then rinsing it with cold water, transferring it back to the oiled pan, adding any additional ingredients if applicable, and letting the rice steam until cooked and a crispy tadig has built on the bottom of the pan. The rice corns nicely puff and don’t stick to each other, so they can be beautifully arranged in a light and fluffy heap. Many of my Non-Iranian friends ask me, how do you get your rice so puffy and fluffy? This is how.

Kateh is the method of cooking the rice in a pan with approx. double the amount of water. Once most of the water has evaporated, any additional ingredients are added and then the rice is steamed with a lid on over low heat. This way of cooking rice takes less effort and the nutrients aren’t drained away with the cooking water. You can still get a nice tadig using this method, especially if you add a bit of oil or ghee to the rice. The result looks more like a ‘rice cake’.

In this recipe I am explaining the aabkesh method of cooking Baghali Polo. I recently wrote a recipe for Nokhod Polo, which is the same thing as Baghali Polo, only with peas instead of broad beans. In the Nokhod Polo recipe I describe the Kateh cooking method, so if you prefer your Baghali Polo Kateh style, jump over there and follow that recipe. Simply replace the peas with 5 minute ‘al dente’ pre-cooked broad beans. This is also where you find my recipe for Mahiche, the tender lamb shanks Baghali Polo is usually served with.

Baghali Polo | Persian Rice with Dill and Broad Beans | igotitfrommymaman.com

Ingredients for Baghali Polo (serving 4)

600g basmati rice (3 cups)

120g frozen or fresh broad beans (1 cup)

1 large bunch fresh dill or 30g dried dill (1 cup)

8 tbsp ghee (cleared butter) or vegetable oil

1/4 tsp saffron

6 tbsp salt + extra to taste

Time

Prep: 10 min

Cook: 1 h 20 min

Total: 1 h 30 min

Baghali Polo | Persian Rice with Dill and Broad Beans | igotitfrommymaman.com

Method of cooking Baghali Polo

Prep the ingredients

If you are using fresh dill wash it and spread it out on a clean kitchen towel to dry.

Combine the saffron with a few tbsp freshly boiled water and let it sit in a warm place.

Wash the rice by transferring it to a bowl, adding water, moving it around with your hand, rinsing the water, and repeating these steps 3 to 4 times.

Pre-cook the broad beans in boiling salted water for about 5 minutes. They should still have a bit of bite to them when you try them, so they don’t turn to mash in the rice later on. Shock them with cold water to interrupt the cooking process.

If you are using fresh dill chop it now.

Pre-cook the rice

Bring a large pan of water to boil and dissolve 6 tbsp of salt in it. Don’t worry, you will wash most of the salt off the rice later. Trust me, if you use any less your rice will taste bland.

Add the rice to the pan and keep the water boiling. Let it pre-cook until the rice corns are soft on the outside but still have bite in the centre. How long this process takes depends on your rice. I’m using Tilda basmati rice and it only takes 3 minutes for the rice to cook to this stage. It might take anything from 3 to 7 minutes.

Once your rice is pre-cooked, drain it in a colander and rinse it with cold water to interrupt the cooking process and wash off the excess salt.

Layer the ingredients

Cover the bottom of a coated pan with ghee or vegetable oil. Add 1 tbsp of water to it and give it a quick shake. Then add some of the broad beans and dill to it. Now add one layer of rice. You can taste the rice now and add a little more salt if necessary. Add another layer of beans and dill, then more rice and so on until all your ingredients are used up. Finish with a layer of broad beans and dill.

Combine 3 tbsp of vegetable oil or ghee with 3 tbsp water and pour it over the rice.

Poke a few holes through the rice to the bottom of the pan using the back of a wooden spoon. This way the moisture can evaporate more easily. Cover the lid with a clean kitchen towel and firmly close the pan with it. Let the rice steam over low heat for at least 60 minutes.

Arrange and serve your Baghali Polo

After 1 hour you can touch the outside of the pan with a wet kitchen towel. If it makes a sound like ‘tshhh’ your rice is done.

You can submerge the bottom of the pan in a sink filled with cold water to make the rice and tadig come off easily. Just a fair warning, this might not be the best practice when using expensive coated pans. If you have a good quality pan, the rice shouldn’t stick and if you have a less valuable pan you might as well risk it – at least that’s what I’ve been doing and the coating is still intact.

Transfer a small part of the rice into a bowl and combine it with the saffron water. Arrange the yellow saffron rice on top of the Baghali Polo. You can serve the tadig (crispy bits) separately.

Again, if you prefer the easier and more nutritious version of Baghali Polo, take a look at my Nokhod Polo recipe and simply replace the peas with pre-cooked broad beans.

Now you can serve your Baghali Polo with decilious Mahiche. Enjoy!

Baghali Polo | Persian Rice with Dill and Broad Beans | igotitfrommymaman.com

Baghali Polo

Course Main Course, Side Dish
Cuisine Persian
Keyword Baghali Polo, broad beans, dill, Persian rice, Rice
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 20 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Servings 4 people

Ingredients

  • 600 g basmati rice 3 cups
  • 120 g frozen or fresh broad beans 1 cup
  • 1 large bunch fresh dill or 30g dried dill 1 cup
  • 8 tbsp ghee (cleared butter) or vegetable oil
  • 1/4 tsp saffron
  • 6 tbsp salt + extra to taste

Instructions

Prep the ingredients

  1. If you are using fresh dill wash it and spread it out on a clean kitchen towel to dry.

  2. Combine the saffron with a few tbsp freshly boiled water and let it sit in a warm place.

  3. Wash the rice by transferring it to a bowl, adding water, moving it around with your hand, rinsing the water, and repeating these steps 3 to 4 times.

  4. Pre-cook the broad beans in boiling salted water for about 5 minutes. They should still have a bit of bite to them when you try them, so they don’t turn to mash in the rice later on. Shock them with cold water to interrupt the cooking process.

  5. If you are using fresh dill chop it now.

Pre-cook the rice

  1. Bring a large pan of water to boil and dissolve 6 tbsp of salt in it. Don’t worry, you will wash most of the salt off the rice later. Trust me, if you use any less your rice will taste bland.
  2. Add the rice to the pan and keep the water boiling. Let it pre-cook until the rice corns are soft on the outside but still have bite in the centre. They should be ‘al dente’. How long this process takes depends on your rice. I’m using Tilda basmati rice and it only takes 3 minutes for the rice to cook to this stage. It might take anything from 3 to 7 minutes.
  3. Once your rice is pre-cooked drain it in a colander and rinse it with cold water to interrupt the cooking process and wash off the excess salt.
  4. Layer the ingredients
  5. Cover the bottom of a coated pan with ghee or vegetable oil. Add 1 tbsp of water to it and give it a quick shake. Then add some of the broad beans and dill to it. Now add one layer of rice. You can taste the rice now and add a little more salt if necessary. Add another layer of beans and dill, then more rice and so on until all your ingredients are used up. Finish with a layer of broad beans and dill.
  6. Combine 3 tbsp of vegetable oil or ghee with 3 tbsp water and pour it over the rice.
  7. Poke a few holes through the rice to the bottom of the pan using the back of a wooden spoon. This way the moisture can evaporate more easily. Cover the lid with a clean kitchen towel and firmly close the pan with it. Let the rice steam over low heat for at least 60 minutes. 

Arrange and serve your Baghali Polo

  1. After 1 hour you can touch the outside of the pan with a wet kitchen towel. If it makes a sound like ‘tshhh’ your rice is done.
  2. You can submerge the bottom of the pan in a sink filled with cold water to make the rice and tadig come off easily. Just a fair warning, this might not be the best practice when using expensive coated pans. If you have a good quality pan, the rice shouldn’t stick and if you have a less valuable pan you might as well risk shocking it in cold water – at least that’s what I’ve been doing with mine and the coating is still intact. 
  3. Transfer a small part of the rice into a bowl and combine it with the saffron water. Arrange the yellow saffron rice on top of the Baghali Polo. You can serve the tadig (crispy bits) separately. 
  4. Again, if you prefer the easier and more nutritious version of Baghali Polo Kateh style, take a look at my Nokhod Polo recipe and simply replace the peas with pre-cooked broad beans.
  5. Now you can serve your Baghali Polo with decilious Mahiche. Enjoy!

I hope you enjoyed this recipe! If you have any questions please let me know in the comments, I’m always happy to help. I’d love to see your Baghali Polo ba Mahiche! Feel free to tag me with @igotitfrommymaman on Facebook or Insta so I can take a look and give you a thumbs up!

Wanna save this recipe for later? You can print out the printable version above or pin it to your recipe board.

Looking for more Persian recipes? Here are my Persian classics!

Do you wanna learn more about Persian cooking? Sign up to Maman’s recipe mail so you will get notified of new recipes on the blog.

Thanks for stopping by! Enjoy your meal!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.